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Posts Tagged ‘IWD’

A huge thank you to everyone who supported our bake sale and clothing drive yesterday! We raised over $170 for LEAF’s Bertah Wilson Fund, and collected an impressive amount of clothing and products for the Elizabeth Fry Society.

We also got some interesting feedback from our ‘share your thoughts’ posters, which we thought we’d post here in case you didn’t get a chance to have a look in person. Here they are in all their unedited, anonymous glory. On that note, we’d love to keep the discussion going, so please feel free to comment!

Question: In 2010, Justice Himel (Ont SCJ) struck down the living on the avails, bawdy house, and solicitation provisions of the Criminal Code. Does Justice Himel’s decision promote women’s equality?

Your thoughts:

– “This is step 1 – ie., letting these women come to the law for help. Step 2 is putting programs in place to better insure safety and health”

– “It has the potential to promote women’s equality, but without a comprehensive program to address these issues, women’s equality will be stalled”

Question: Women make up 14% of corporate boards in Canada. The EU is considering mandatory quotas for women on corporate boards. If Canada followed the EU’s example, would it promote gender equality?

Your thoughts:

– “No. the % is  much lower in Europe. This is only an issue today, but i believe the problem will be solved organically in very short order as more women hired in the 80s and 90s make it to upper management positions at our major corporations. The corporate elite will probably be unrecognizably diverse within 10 years.”

– “[arrow indicating direct response to previous comment] that’s something of a ridiculous assumption. The diversity of the corporate elite hasn’t changed much in the last one hundred years. There is very little support for an argument it will change radically in the next 10 yrears.”

– “No – even if the women deserved to be there, there would be underlying rumours that they were only there because of quotas. Better to earn it honestly. Time will even it out.”

Question: Quebec’s Bill 94 would refuse reasonable accomodation to niqab-wearing women receiving or providing public services. Does Bill 94 promote gender equality?

Your thoughts:

– “no”

– “I second that”

– “It doesn’t support equality of any kind”

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The IWD march on Tuesday was fantastic. There was a big, loud and proud crowd marching down Broadway and Memorial – and many shouts and honks of support from vehicles passing by. There were placards demanding justice for missing and murdered Aboriginal women and for Sisters in Spirit. There were signs decrying Harper’s regressive stance on women and equality. There were signs shouting “My miniskirt does not equal consent!” The radical cheerleaders kept the chants going throughout.

To me, it is abundantly clear that these marches are still necessary. IWD is on one hand celebratory. After all, we’ve come a long way and our mothers, grandmothers and great-grandmothers achieved a lot in the last 100 years. Would I be in law school today without all the work they did? But there is still so much to do. One focus should be international, but it seems to go without saying that there is also still much to do here at home. Yet not everyone agrees with me on this front. Check out two Globe & Mail columns that debate the place of Canadian feminism today:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/opinion/for-the-free-educated-and-affluent-welcome-to-the-century-of-women/article1933187/

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/relationships/news-and-views/judith-timson/equality-for-women-were-not-done-fighting-yet/article1937343/

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Happy 100th birthday IWD. The first IWD was run in 1911. The following history comes from www.internationalwomensday.com

“Following the decision agreed at Copenhagen in 1911, International Women’s Day (IWD) was honoured the first time in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland on 19 March. More than one million women and men attended IWD rallies campaigning for women’s rights to work, vote, be trained, to hold public office and end discrimination. However less than a week later on 25 March, the tragic ‘Triangle Fire’ in New York City took the lives of more than 140 working women, most of them Italian and Jewish immigrants. This disastrous event drew significant attention to working conditions and labour legislation in the United States that became a focus of subsequent International Women’s Day events. 1911 also saw women’s ‘Bread and Roses’ campaign.”

IWD is a day for celebration. We’ve come a long way in 100 years. Its also pretty wonderful to take a day and just celebrate being women. But, its also a day to reflect on how much there still is to do, both here in Canada and also around the world. This article from the Globe and Mail is a beautiful and heart-wrenching look at how women experience life as women around the world.  What can we do for them? What can we do here at home to move closer to true equality? This video questions whether men and women in developed countries really are equals. What do you think?

What does IWD mean to you?

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Come together on March 8th in celebration, support and solidarity for the International Women’s Day March!

This year marks the centenary of International Women’s Day. In 100 years, we have come so far but have so far still to go. The recent decision of Justice Dewar demonstrates how pervasive sexism still is. The decision highlights the need for feminists of all ages, genders, orientations, sizes and colours to come together to show our strength and our commitment to fighting inequality in its many forms and manifestations.

So sport your FLF shirt and join us!

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY MARCH: RESPECT, PEACE, LOVE, AND JUSTICE – 100 YEAR’S OF WOMEN’S RESISTANCE

March 8, 2011

4:30 – 7:30 pm

4:30 pm: Speakers and chants by the Radical Cheerleaders. 5:30 PM: March. 6:30 PM: Raging Grannies and community feast at the UofW’s Bulman Centre

The march will begin at Union Centre (Smith and Broadway), stop at the Legislature, and then finish at the U of W.


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